Home  >  About Canada  >  Demographics

The Canada 2016 Census enumerated a total population of 35,151,728. Between 2011 and May 2016, Canada's population grew by 1.7 million people, with immigrants accounting for two-thirds of the increase. Between 1990 and 2008, the population increased by 5.6 million, equivalent to 20.4 percent overall growth. The main driver of population growth is immigration. 

 

Canada has one of the highest per-capita immigration rates in the world,[239] driven mainly by economic policy and, to a lesser extent, family reunification. The Canadian public as-well as the major political parties support the current level of immigration. In 2014, a total of 260,400 immigrants were admitted to Canada, mainly from Asia. The Canadian government anticipated between 280,000 and 305,000 new permanent residents in the following years, a similar number of immigrants as in recent years. New immigrants settle mostly in major urban areas such as Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. Canada also accepts large numbers of refugees, accounting for over 10 percent of annual global refugee resettlements.

 

Canada's population density, at 3.7 inhabitants per square kilometer (9.6/sq mi), is among the lowest in the world. Canada spans latitudinally from the 83rd parallel north to the 41st parallel north, and approximately 95% of the population is found south of the 55th parallel north. About four-fifths of the population lives within 150 kilometres (93 mi) of the contiguous United States border. The most densely populated part of the country, accounting for nearly 50 percent, is the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor in Southern Quebec and Southern Ontario along the Great Lakes and the Saint Lawrence River. An additional 30 percent live along the British Columbia Lower Mainland, and the Calgary–Edmonton Corridor in Alberta.

 

In common with many other developed countries, Canada is experiencing a demographic shift towards an older population, with more retirees and fewer people of working age. In 2006, the average age was 39.5 years; by 2011, it had risen to approximately 39.9 years.

 

As of 2013, the average life expectancy for Canadians is 81 years. The majority of Canadians (69.9%) live in family households, 26.8% report living alone, and those living with unrelated persons reported at 3.7%. The average size of a household in 2006 was 2.5 people.

 

 

More detailed information about Canadian demographics can be found here on Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Canada

©2018 by Lana Immigration Consulting Services Canada

  • Our YouTube Channel